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Archive for July 11th, 2016

I am writing a series of posts about my recent trip to Tanzania, Africa.  You can find the first post here about ceramic water filters.

The second day of our tour led us to our first safari experience on the Tarangire.  Tarangire means “river of the warthogs.”  Geographically, it is classified as a wooded grassland savannah.

I was fascinated by the movement of the animals.  They do not seem to care at all that their territory is being invaded by these monster safari vehicles.  They just carry on with the business of eating and drinking.

The birds are beautiful here.  Even the pesky birds that peck the ground at the picnic area are amazing.  They are called the superb starling.  And they are truly superb.

Splendid starling

Superb starling

In the Tarangire, we witnessed a part of the great migration with zebras and wildebeests rushing to a watering hole.  I captured this movement on video.

 

zebra with wildebeest

zebra with wildebeest

The guides communicate by radio.  We would hear quick Swahili words then drive to something amazing.  One of these sights was a python that had obviously eaten something really large.  It lay still under a bush.  We were told it would not be able to move for a month.  Thank God.  After that sight, I stopped drinking water.  I was not going to have to go in a bush (water the flowers) for anything.

For these next few days we stayed on Lake Burunge.  The dining area overlooked the lake where thousands of pink flamingoes waded.  We had a nature hike to view these birds closer up.  We were accompanied by a Maasai warrior with his spear in case we encountered any dangerous animals.

Lake Burunge sunset

Lake Burunge sunset

 

flamingoes

flamingoes

 

Maasai guard

Maasai guard

Our guide assured us that Maasai are trained at a very young age to defend their animals.  We could hear hyenas in the distance and were told the following morning that our guards were awake all night chasing them from our camp.  These tents were permanent solar-powered structures up on wooden platforms.  I was not afraid.  I trusted the guards would keep us safe.

Click on the video to view the zebras and wildebeests flocking to the watering hole, a family of elephants crossing our path, and a harem of ostriches.  I thought about toying with the sound but decided to leave it in for you to have an authentic experience.  Enjoy!

 

 

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