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Posts Tagged ‘magnetic poetry’

Today I’m tired.  I spent yesterday outdoors in wonderful warm spring air at the Festival International de Louisiane.  Today I am tired all over my body.  We walked, we drank, we ate festival food, and danced.  Too much.  Today I wasn’t going to write, but my friend in this daily poetry game, Christie Wyman, wrote using online magnetic poetry, nature version, because she didn’t want to get off the sofa.  Like Christie, I am writing by moving pieces around on my computer.  Is this really writing?  Thus the title for today’s blog, Lazy Poet.

 

Being an itinerant teacher, I drive from parking lot to parking lot.  During March Slice of Life Challenge, I wrote about the shoe in the parking lot that seemed to be haunting me.  This week, I noticed a tiny wild flower blossoming amidst the stones.  So here’s a little quiet moment to breathe.

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The more I play with the poetry tools, the less I trust them.  I want to manipulate the words into something, anything that rings true.  Yesterday I combined magnetic word pieces with metaphor dice.  Both of these poems interested me, but I don’t think either is a great poem.  Let’s just live in the moment for a moment.

 

White misty rose
unspoken kiss
of light wine

True summer echoes
as delicate time lost
my bare feet say-shine

 

 

 

 

 

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National Poetry Month 2019: I am playing with poetry alongside Mary Lee Hahn, Jone Rush MacCulloch.Christie Wyman, Molly Hogan, and Catherine Flynn.

William Carlos Williams’ poetry has something to teach us about imagery and noticing the ordinary.  His famous poem about the wheelbarrow describes a specific image.  My students immediately imagined the setting as a farm.  Using magnetic poetry words, we found images to create our own “So Much Depends Upon” poems. 

The fifth graders are in state testing this week.  They test on computers.  Since my classroom is in a corner one of the computer labs, I had to find another place to teach.  It was a gorgeous spring day, so we went outside to the garden.  Kaia wrote this magnetic poem:

So much depends upon
a misty garden
spring smell symphony
near the white sea.

We were looking around the garden and found four monarch caterpillars eating the milkweed.  Kaia talked about all she was learning in science about the caterpillars.  Gathering words from the air (not using any toys), I wrote the following poem:


So much depends
upon

the tall
milkweed

dotted
with sunspots

feeding
hungry caterpillars

in
the school garden





You can read more student poems at our Kidblog site. 


(A word about WordPress.  I am having trouble with formatting my posts.  They look correctly aligned to the left margin in the editor mode, but when published, everything changes to centered.  I am getting frustrated with this and don’t know how to fix it.  Does anyone reading this post know what’s going on with the wordpress editor?)



 

 

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This month I am playing with poetry with poet-teacher-blogger friends.  Feel free to play along.

I am also playing alongside my students.  We brought out the cookie sheets of magnetic poetry. I talked about two similar poem forms, the How to poem and the Things to do poem.  You can read their poems here.

I also played with my Word Swag app in my phone to create a more beautiful and professional looking image.

Here’s another on the cookie sheet.  I can’t remember who brilliantly suggested using cookie sheets for magnetic poetry, but it works great.  For an itinerant teacher like me, it’s a convenient way to carry them.  I also have some in a tin which works equally as well.  The lid of the tin serves as a composition space.

I have a new student, Maddox, in 4th grade.  Sometimes kids walk into my classroom already knowing how to be a poet.  Here is Maddox’s first poem.

How to Be a Storm

rock the ships below
boom like a thundering drum
blast the air with a gale
use your wrath in a tempestuous storm
then let the sun shine again

—Maddox, 4th grade

 

 

 

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