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Posts Tagged ‘Thinglink’

Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

Every month the gifted 6th grade students in our parish (district) are getting together to work on a collaborative project. We started this program four years ago as a way of overcoming 6th grade underachievement and to get all our students together for one purpose. In our district there are often only one or two gifted students in each grade in each school. Isolation and low motivation were hampering our oldest students. This program has also helped the students as they move on to middle school in 7th grade.

This week was our second meeting with these students. The theme for this year is Wonder. We are looking at different Wonders of the World as well as reading Wonder and thinking about other wonders such as art and oak trees. I led a technology lesson on the use of Thinglink. I opened the program and led them through step by step by making a mock Thinglink on cats. Then I showed them one I had done on the Aurora Borealis.

While many technology lessons were learned (how to link, fair use of images, and reliable sources), I don’t think the students learned much about their chosen topic. I know this because I asked my sixth graders to present their Thinglinks to the other students in our class. One student presented his Thinglink about Mt. Everest. He didn’t even know where it was located. So what was the problem?

Expectations! Ah, yes. When I introduced using the Thinglink, I did not set up expectations through a rubric. Today, I am working to solve that issue before I have my own students try Thinglink. We are beginning quarterly book talks. Thinglink would make a great site for creating a book talk.

I searched online for rubrics for Thinglink. Here is one in pdf form by Spokane Schools.

I edited another rubric using some of my own requirements. The downfall in my lesson for the 6th graders was I did not set up a content requirement ahead of time. If I’m not intentional, students will play with the app adding in link after link without ever learning anything about the topic. Here is a general RubricforThinglinkProject I created for Thinglink projects.

https://www.thinglink.com/scene/571760040139030530 (Click here to go to Thinglink on Analyzing Tone.)

Thinglink is a great app for teaching as well as for student projects. I need to teach my students about tone in literature and poetry. I found a blog post complete with images and videos to analyze. So for my lesson on tone, I linked up a Thinglink. (The content for this Thinglink was gathered from David Sebek.) You are welcome to use it, but please let me know how it goes.

Link up your Digital Literacy Sunday posts here with Mr. Linky.

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Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

Welcome to DigiLit Sunday. Please consider joining in the roundup by posting a Digital Literacy post and linking up with Mr. Linky.

I am working on framing my daily language lessons for my gifted students in grades 5 and 6 using WONDER. Here is a form for creating your own Wonder lesson. Wonder template for ELA (2) This framework will lead my students to explore Wonderopolis, an amazing educational site, as well as help them respond to real-world content. These frames are aligned to the Common Core Standards and use pre-AP skills.

I worked on the Thinglink Teacher Challenge this summer. I wanted to put my Wonder framework into a Thinglink image. I used Starling Murmurations as the Wonder for this experiment. I also tried PollDaddy to embed two polls, one for a definition and one for a question. I put in links with each of the Wonder activities. These activities include

  • W- Exploring the wonder
  • O- What is your opinion?
  • N- Notes, find words of awe and wonder
  • D- Define phenomenon
  • E- On Tapestry, rewrite phrases to create a logical sentence.
  • R- Response to reading: Summarize and article.

Here is the link to Thinglink: 

Have you ever wondered about Starling Murmurations?

Have you ever wondered about Starling Murmurations?

I wonder if Thinglink will make the work of Wonder more motivating or more time-consuming.  Will Thinglink be a useful tool in my classroom or not worth the time it takes me to create one?  All this remains to be seen as I begin working with my students this year.  All in all, trying new applications is challenging and fun, so I hope my excitement translates to the children.

What new technology will you try this year?  Don’t forget to link up.

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Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

For DigiLit Sunday, I invited friends to submit flower poems for this Thinglink video. I have been working on Thinglink this summer through their teacher’s challenge. I have also been participating in the National Writing Project and Innovative Educators Making Learning Connected (CLMOOC). Thinglink offered me a preview of their video application. CLMOOC challenged us this week to think about games. Combining the two, we played with flower poems. I want to thank those who took the challenge to write a flower poem and contribute to this video: Sheri Edwards, Diane Mayr, Linda Baie, and Kaylie Bonin. Each flower poem is linked to the video. I used Tapestry to publish the poems.

Use this link to find the video: http://video.thinglink.com/v/132

Click to follow the link to Thinglink video.

Click to follow the link to Thinglink video.

Thinglink is offering to you, my readers, an early access code to Thinglink for video. First sign up for a teacher account on Thinglink. Then login to your account on video.thinglink.com This is your unique access code: tlvideo_for_reflectionsontheteche.

Here is a How to video from Susan Oxnevad.

Link up your DigiLit Sunday post with Mr. Linky:

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Poetry Friday Round-up

Poetry Friday Round-up


Join the 4th of July Poetry Friday Roundup at My Juicy Little Universe.

A friend posted a video on Facebook. You may have seen it, too, of the elapsed time photos of flowers blooming. I was inspired to write short poems, haiku-type, about the different flowers. For each one, I googled the flower and used facts in the creation of the poem. For example, a gladiola is also known as a sword lily. Then I found creative commons photos, uploaded to Tapestry, and wrote a poem. I would like to include more poems in my Thinglink video creation, so if you would like to add a poem, please write one in the comments. Or you can do it in Tapestry and send me the link. I’ll post the link for the final video on Sunday on my DigiLit Sunday post. Also, on Sunday I’ll have an offer code from Thinglink for early access to Thinglink for video.

Daylily Sunshine

Iris Rising

Glad Sunshine

Click the image below to watch A Vida Das Flores.

Click to follow the link to Thinglink video.

Click to follow the link to Thinglink video.

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Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts


Please join in this meme designed to share our digital learning and challenges. Just as a teacher of writing needs to be a writer, a teacher of digital literacy needs to be a digital learner. Use this button on your blog post and leave a link with Mr. Linky. Please read and comment on other posts. That’s how connectedness and collaboration begin.

Reflection is another means to apply the Connected Learning principles of being Interest-Powered and Production Centered by considering what you’re making and interests are now, and what your orientation is for the immediate future. –Chris Butts, CLMOOC team

clmooc

I have jumped right in to the waters of two digital challenges: The Thinglink Teacher Challenge and National Writing Project’s Making Learning Connected, a.k.a. #clmooc.

summer_challenge8

Yesterday’s email from the CLMOOC team asked us to make a list of three things and to reflect on two questions.

1. What I’ve made so far…

How to pick blueberries: Thinglink
Self avatar: Bitstrip
profile_pic

Digital Self: Thinglink

How to be water: Animoto/YouTube

2. What I’m working on:

Poster about writing in Canva: This is a higher learning curve than other apps I tried this week. I struggled and gave up. But I am determined to try again and conquer this!

3. What I want to work on:

Prezi is a presentation site that I am daunted by. I have seen others do great things with it, and I’m sure my students would love it.

Reflections:

What did you learn from what you’ve already made? I learned to be more confident in my digital self. The Thinglink challenge for this week was to make a digital self. I thought I had to draw something. I started working on my ipad with a new stylus and became quickly annoyed. Then I googled avatar and low and behold, there’s an app for that! I was surprised how easy it was. So many online apps can make you feel stupid, but some, like Bitstrips, made me feel smart.

What do you see as the purpose of making this week? The purpose for me always goes back to my teaching and being able to support my students in their digital learning. However, I also discovered that making was fun, and I was compelled to share (and show off). I want to invite you to take the plunge. Jump in the deep end because there are lots of supportive floatie people out there.

I wanted to make a blog icon for the Connected Learning values, so after writing this post, I tried Canva again. It worked better for this purpose. You should try it.

Connected Learning

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  Join the Two Writing Teachers Slice of Life Challenge.

Join the Two Writing Teachers Slice of Life Challenge.

summer_challenge8

Summer is a wide open blank canvas. I have been painting things onto this summer canvas. So many things. Too many things? One of these things is the Thinglink Teacher Challenge. I wanted to learn more about this new online platform, so I signed up for the challenge. The first week wasn’t too difficult. A How-to assignment. I used an image from blueberry picking last week and added links to my blog post, an article about the farm, and a recipe for blueberry cobbler. I enjoy being able to actively do what I will ask my students to do.

Click here to see the image in Thinglink with embedded links.

Kaylie has been keeping up summer writing. I think it may be time for her to get her own blog. Here is a link to her Slice today. It was a crazy stormy morning here. There were tornado watches and heavy rain. Kaylie captures the scary feeling in her poem,”Slicing through the Storm.”

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Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

Please use this button on your site for DigiLit Sunday posts

Have you heard about Thinglink? I’m not sure where I first heard about it, but I recently was invited by Thinglink to give it a try. From what I did so far, it looks like another presentation site based on images. When I went to the site, signed up, and logged in, I was stuck. There was no place to click to move forward. Finally after some frustration, I hit the back page button and found on the home page the button for Learn More. That took me to a page that had a button for Create. There I was able to move forward and create a page. I uploaded a picture I took on our afternoon nursery trip. Since I had previously written a poem about an amaryllis, I recorded it on Soundcloud and was able to link it to the picture. I also linked an information page about the amaryllis.

I embedded the image here, but the links do not embed. You have to click on the link to go directly to the Thinglink page to get to the links.

Thinglink allows for adding students. I am interested in trying this out with my students, perhaps on a research project or to write about a book they’ve read. Have any of you used Thinglink with students? I’d love to hear about your thoughts and ideas.

http://www.thinglink.com/scene/529405214067785730

Link up your Digital Literacy posts using Mr. Linky.

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