Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Bayou Teche’

Michelle Heidenrich Barnes hosts today with an announcement of the third collection of Today’s Little Ditty.
I have a little ditty in the book as do many of my PF friends.

A few weeks ago I grabbed a poetry writing idea from Kim Douillard.  She had her students make heart maps about a place they love and write a poem after Lee Bennett Hopkins’ City I Love.

I did this with my students. We cut simple heart shapes from plain paper and drew and wrote on them. Then glued them into our notebooks.  Here’s a photo of one of mine.

On the Bayou I Live Near

after Lee Bennett Hopkins

On the bayou I live near–
bayou I love–
morning sun streams
in wide golden beams
gleaming a new day.

On the bayou I live near–
bayou I love–
afternoons bloom
while speedboats vroom
through sweet olive perfume.

On the bayou I live near–
bayou I love–
sunsets glisten,
a lone heron listens
as the hoot owl
who, who, whos
me
to
sleep.


Margaret Simon, draft 2019

Read Full Post »

See more posts at Two Writing Teachers Slice of Life

Baker’s dozen wood duck eggs!

“There is motion at your wood duck house.”

It comes as an alert on my phone.  I can’t help but look.

Two weeks ago, we set up the wood duck house that my husband had made.  The next day a hen came.

We placed a Ring doorbell camera on the roof of the house, so anytime there is motion, the device records a video and sends it to my phone.  Incredible technology!

Incredible nature!

I marvel at how this bird knows exactly what to do.  For the last two weeks, she has come into the house daily.  In the morning, she flies in, rearranges the furniture, and lays a few eggs.  Then she leaves.

I’ve watched each day, and if she didn’t cover them up with the shavings, I can count the eggs.  The count approached a dozen.

I’ve been posting updates to my Instagram and Facebook accounts.  I wrote the first post about the house here.

Last night as we were having dinner, my phone buzzed.  This was unusual to get an alert at night.  And the alerts continued.

The wood duck hen came in at 7:09 last night, and she’s still there!

Now we count 29-31 days to hatching.  But the big day is the day after hatching when the baby ducklings climb up the side of the box and JUMP!  If it’s a school day, I will have to call in sick.

Read Full Post »

See more posts at Two Writing Teachers Slice of Life .

Living on the Bayou Teche has many benefits.  In the fall we joined the T.E.C.H.E. Project, a nonprofit dedicated to the preservation of the Bayou Teche.  In January, my husband Jeff attended one of their workshops on wood duck houses.  When he came home and started talking about it, I knew this was something we needed to do.  But the idea brewed for a while until I got a text from a friend who lives downstream.  She had set up a Ring camera in her wood duck house and a hen had come in.  She sent me the video, and I was sold.

The next day we toured her wood duck set up, and Jeff said, “We can do this!”  He found the wood he needed and got to work.  We took a trip to Costco to buy the Ring device.  It’s intended for use as a doorbell.  So genius!  It connects through your Wifi and sends motion detection with video to your phone.  What will they think of next?!

This weekend Jeff finished the house and got the pole in the ground.  We set up the Ring device and had it all ready by 4:00 PM on Sunday.

On Monday morning while I was hurriedly getting ready for school (I always run late on Monday!), I got an alert on my phone, “Movement detected at the wood duck house!”  Already!

Sure enough, a hen had come inside and posed for the camera.  When we looked outside, though, we noticed Buzz, our outside cat guarding with watchful eye.  “On Jump Day, Buzz will be in the shed,” Jeff said.  Jump Day happens on the day after the eggs hatch.  All the little ducks jump out to the water.  I’m so glad we invested in the camera, so we can keep an eye on this whole process.

 

 

Buzz keeps an eye on the wood ducks.

 

Read Full Post »

Sunday afternoon was so gorgeous we had to stop and take a canoe trip down the bayou.  The temperatures were in the 70’s which we won’t likely see again for a while as December begins to roll in on cooler waves.  I really believe that the cypress trees are more beautiful this year with their bronze needles that still cling to the branches.  We stopped by a neighbor’s house and chatted with her while a fat water snake slithered from a nearby bush.  Yes, it freaked me out, and I became jumpy.  Everything became a snake: branches, leaves, jumping fish, scurrying squirrels. But soon my heebie-jeebies subsided, and I enjoyed the scenery.  With the still water, the reflections were picture perfect.

December on Bayou Teche by Margaret Simon

Dusk, hawks are hunting,
Scouting a slithering snake.
Keep paddle moving.

(c) Margaret Simon

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Poetry Friday round-up is with Jama at Jama’s Alphabet Soup.

 

Autumn takes its time coming to South Louisiana.  It comes in small, unnoticeable ways like the browning of cypress trees, or in larger, violent ways as in a storm leading a cold front. So here we are on the second day of November and temperatures have dropped to the 50’s, a pleasant change from the 80’s to 90’s of the previous six months.  I so envy the images of orange and red fall leaves filling the trees.

Since we have not changed our clocks quite yet, the sun is coming up later each morning, and I’ve noticed a heron on the bayou sitting right in the direct ray of the rising sun.  I tried to capture him with my telephoto lens, but he heard me and flew off.  No matter.  I can still write him into a poem.

Carol Varsalona curates a gallery at her blog site for every season.  Currently she is collecting images and poems for Abundant Autumn. I borrowed a photograph of a heron at the beach from fellow poet (and better photographer than me) Wendi Romero to use as a backdrop to my poem. I love how the challenges of Poetry Friday peeps push me to spread my writing wings.

Read Full Post »

What do you do with a perfect day?

Sky’s a clear blue… let’s canoe…bayou still…no wind…smooth strokes…sun setting slow…an orange glow behind the towering smoke stack…abandoned mill…concrete riprap…a nest for trash…discarded life tokens.

A distant roar…speed boat…they see us hanging at the edge…cut the motor……push, pull, turn…cross waves…speed on.

Crossing under the bridge…sun’s gone…sky darkens…paddle strengthens…then we hear it…a distant hoot…the owl swishes overhead…beginning his hunt…who-cooks-for-you-you-all familiar call…calling sunset’s end… pull to dock…warm glow of home.

The idea for this poetry format came from Poets and Writers The Time is Now Writing Prompts. 

Read Full Post »

Click over to Mary Lee’s site for more poetry.

 

Fran McVeigh gave me a magnet at NCTE: “Explore new possibilities.”  I’m considering the word explore for my 2018 One Little Word, but for today, it inspired the title for a poem requested by Carol Varsalona for her #AutumnAblaze gallery.  She saw my photograph on Facebook from a recent canoe voyage on the Bayou Teche (pronounced “tesh”).  I loved the photo, too, and was resistant to writing about it.  I want you to know this is still in draft, so you can leave soft critique in the comments.

Duperier Bridge on Bayou Teche, New Iberia, LA. photo by Margaret Simon

Explore New Possibilities

On the water,
the canoe turns
toward a horizon
I do not know.

I paddle-pull
under a bridge,
listen to the rumble-
a passing car

like thunder from rolling clouds.
Under a bridge
where teenagers
huddle close and smoke,

where wooden gates
direct water
as if one could
contain such a wild thing,

a golden sunset
draws me toward
a new destination.

–Margaret Simon

Mary Lee Hahn invites us to join #haikuforhealing. Inspired by the same photo, a haiku:

where road meets water
a bridge, a golden sunset
a new horizon.

–Margaret Simon

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »