Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for April, 2012

Day 7- Take a walk until you find a tree you identify with, then write a poem using the tree as a metaphor for yourself or your life.

This quote comes to mind when I look at the great cypress in our backyard: “There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children.  One of these is roots; the other, wings.
—William Hodding Carter, Jr.

Old cypress, tall and lean,
roots running deep, branches tall,
offer us protection.

Old cypress, your memory long
crawfish boils and Easter egg hunts,
you watched them all.

Open your branches wide for
nests of birds,
paws of cats,
squabbling squirrels.

Give us your roots,
send forth our wings.

Read Full Post »

30 Day Poetry Challenge  Day 6: Write a poem of any length incorporating every word from your latest Facebook status update in any order.

It took a while to find my last real post.  My posts have been my blog, so I kept looking.  I passed over the post about Berry Queens, not really that poetic.  Then I came to this post: With this little extra day, I was able to finish The Hunger Games just in time for the movie. I resisted and resisted, being encouraged by my student to keep reading. I hated the violence, but now I am intrigued to see the movie.  Too many words to work with, but I took the liberty of picking out some that fit with my thoughts on this gorgeous Good Friday.

In the Springtime, our yard becomes a jungle
growing vines cling to brick
resisting my pull, my tug
my violent raging against invasion.

With time, I am able to clear a path
follow it to the water’s edge.
In this silent game, I keep
tending and trimming.

Today is the day of hunger;
In passion, he gave up his life.
I walk through the mud
plucking the weeds.

How can I know such hunger, such pain?
I didn’t see the movie avoiding the sight
of violence on my Savior.
Yet, the story intrigues:

A crown of thorns–
betrayal–
Here is the man you call
King of the Jews.
It is the law
He should die. Why?
For me? For my clutch of weeds?

I look up into the strong arms
of grandmother oak and notice
the resurrection fern
open, happy, and green.

Read Full Post »

Little about Lemons

30 Day Poetry Challenge Day 5: Write a poem about lemons without using the following words: lemon, yellow, round, fruit, citrus, tart, juicy, peel, and sour.

The scent of a candle
Intoxicating
Spice in my tea
Meyers grow like experts
at beaming sunshine
with hints of honey and thyme
Mix them with cream cheese–
dessert!

100 things to do with a Meyer lemon

Read Full Post »

A Day in Haiku

30 Day Poetry Challenge Day 4: Write a haiku (a three line poem where the first line has 5 syllables, the second line has 7 syllables, and the third line has 5 syllables). Haiku are often about nature, but yours can be about anything.

During the March Slice of Life Challenge, a fellow slicer wrote a series of haiku about his day: Kevin’s Meandering Mind

The storm woke me up at 4:30.  The dog, Charlie, was upset.  I decided to enable his insecurities and cuddle with him on the couch.

Wakened by the storm,
Frightened, we cuddle safely
in each others’ arms.

It’s Spring Break this week, Holy Week.  I scheduled a facial and massage at the spa.

Melting cares away
Massage relieves all tension
relaxation time

Looking out on the bayou after the storm, I saw this egret fishing in the bog behind our house.

Stealthily steps in
egret fishes, alert with
head poised for the catch.

One of the goals of my week off was to repaint my bathroom.  Today, I went to the paint store.

Pick a paint color
Refresh my bathroom walls with
Gratifying Green.

My after school writing students do not have their break until next week, so they came over to write.

Counting syllables
Grace, Isabell, and Patrick
write their best haiku.

Living on the bayou, I watch the daily barge pass by.  Today’s barge was named Louisiana Sunrise.

Watch the barge go by
Louisiana Sunrise
churns the brown bayou.

Can you make a haiku of your day?

Taking the back way
Paddling on the water-way
soft bayou sunset

This video was posted by the 30 Day Poetry Challenge.  It speaks to the art of Western Haiku.

Read Full Post »

Blackberry Time

30 Day Poetry Challenge #3: Find the nearest book.  Turn to page 8.  Copy the first ten words and create a poem.

From page 8 of The Hunger Games: “a few blackberries from the bushes around us. And may…”

Blackberry Time

A few blackberries from the bushes
around us and may
I hold the flavor
on my tongue
now turning purple.
The juice running down through
my fingers staining
my jeans.  The vine grows
like a weed
among thorns
with this small gift of plump purple bites
never asking permission
to invade the flower bed.
Like the love of a teenager,
sweetness grows out of pain.

And a prompt from Bud the Teacher: “Some apples are gifts for special people.  Others are poison.  Which one is this?”

Comment: Sometimes when kids leave home, they leave behind disgusting things.

An Apple

Did you leave
the half-eaten apple
in the drawer behind
the peaches
rotting slowly?

Now that you are gone,
shall I take a bite
to remember you by?
No one is worth
the risk.

Read Full Post »

Can you walk today?

For Minga, my walking partner, friend, and mother-in-law.

30 Day Poetry Challenge #2 “Who was the last person you texted?  Write a five-line poem to that person.

Can you walk today?
Tomorrow, I know, you’ll be walking in
Morocco–yes, the one in Africa.
My traveling Minga mouse,
I’ll always remember Greece.

Read Full Post »

Symphony Sounds

This is April Fool’s Day for sure.  I just typed a new blog post and when I went to preview it, nothing appeared.  So here is my second try.

I finished the 31 Days of March Slice of Life Challenge. Whew!  Didn’t think I could do it.  Now for the 30 Day Poetry Challenge.  The first prompt is to write an acrostic poem, this form uses the letters in your name to create the first letter of each line.  My inspiration comes from the Sunday Symphony in the Park.

Melodies played in the park
Arranged in harmonious
Rhythm.  Tapping my flip-flop foot.
Gathering of folks young and old
Adoring butterflies and bubbles
Round the picnic blanket
Easing on a Sunday afternoon
Taking time to listen.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts